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Campus Life  

New UBCO research suggests recycled concrete could be a sustainable way to keep rubble out of landfills

Shahria Alam, co-director of UBC’s Green Construction Research and Training Centre and the lead investigator of the study.

Shahria Alam, co-director of UBC’s Green Construction Research and Training Centre and the lead investigator of the study.

Recycled concrete can even outperform traditional construction, says researcher

Results of a new five-year study of recycled concrete show that it performs as well, and in several cases even better, than conventional concrete.

Researchers at UBC Okanagan’s School of Engineering conducted side-by-side comparisons of recycled and conventional concrete within two common applications—a building foundation and a municipal sidewalk. They found that the recycled concrete had comparable strength and durability after five years of being in service.

“We live in a world where we are constantly in search of sustainable solutions that remove waste from our landfills,” says Shahria Alam, co-director of UBC’s Green Construction Research and Training Centre and the lead investigator of the study. “A number of countries around the world have already standardized the use of recycled concrete in structural applications, and we hope our findings will help Canada follow suit.”

Waste materials from construction and demolition contribute up to 40 per cent of the world’s waste, according to Alam, and in Canada, that waste amounts to nine million tonnes per year.

The researchers tested the compressive strength and durability of recycled concrete compared with conventional concrete.

Concrete is typically composed of fine or coarse aggregate that is bonded together with an adhesive paste. The recycled concrete replaces the natural aggregate for producing new concrete.

“The composition of the recycled concrete gives that product additional flexibility and adaptability,” says Alam. “Typically, recycled concrete can be used in retaining walls, roads and sidewalks, but we are seeing a shift towards its increased use in structures.”

Within the findings, the researchers discovered that the long-term performance of recycled concrete adequately compared to its conventional form, and experienced no issues over the five years of the study. In fact, the recycled concrete had a higher rate of compressive strength after 28 days of curing while maintaining a greater or equal strength during the period of the research.

The researchers suggest the recycled concrete can be a 100 per cent substitute for non-structural applications.

“As innovations continue in the composition of recycled concrete, we can envision a time in the future where recycle concrete can be a substitute within more structural applications as well.”

The research was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), as well as OK Builders Supplies Ltd. and KonKast Products Ltd. through a Collaborative Research & Development grant. It was published in the Journal Construction and Building Materials.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca



Thorpe and Friends Scholarship recognizes three South Okanagan students

Thorpe Awards 2020_3

Isaac Halverson was visiting a friend when he learned he was a recipient of this year’s Rick and Yasmin Thorpe and Friends Scholarship Fund, but this did not stop him from running around the house screaming in excitement after reading the news.

“It was incredible. I’ve heard about the award before, and I know friends who’ve received it,” says Halverson, who previously attended Princess Margaret Secondary School in Penticton. Halverson is now in his first year at Okanagan College taking engineering.

“It’s a lot of money, and it means a lot to me.”

Halverson is one of three South Okanagan high school graduates to have received this year’s Rick and Yasmin Thorpe and Friends Scholarship, which provides $2,500 towards their first year at Okanagan College.

The annual awards are given to high school students who demonstrate good grades while contributing to their communities.

Paige Russill and Verity Taylor, both graduates of Summerland Secondary School, also received the awards.

Russill is taking her first semester of an Associate of Arts Degree at the College. She says she wasn’t able to work as much as she wanted as a result of COVID-19, and this scholarship will help pay for her education.

Taylor is also taking the first year of an Associate of Arts Degree with the goal of majoring in psychology and working with children and youth. Taylor says in addition to the funds, she is proud to receive the recognition.

“I really appreciate being chosen for such a prestigious award and I’m thankful for it,” says the seventeen-year-old. “It’s being put to good use to better my future.”

Since 2006 Rick and Yasmin Thorpe, along with their friends, have helped more than 70 students, donating $153,500 to their studies at Okanagan College.

“Our goal is to assist first-year students,” says Rick. “I was impressed by their enthusiasm and now they’re going to Okanagan College and achieving their goals.”

“This year with the COVID-19 pandemic, these awards are even more necessary for students who are probably not going to their jobs,” adds Yasmin.  “The help we give to students makes me feel so good.”

Recently, the Okanagan College Foundation recognized the Thorpe’s longstanding support with a commemorative booklet featuring updates from students who’ve received the awards over the last 14 years.

“Thank you for being an integral part of Okanagan College’s mission to transform lives and communities,” writes Okanagan College President Jim Hamilton and Okanagan College Foundation Executive Director Helen Jackman.??

Students describe your support as pivotal, providing monetary relief but also serving as a source of inspiration and strength. Your award and the recognition that comes with it, helps instill a belief in students that they can achieve great things. Your generous commitment to our students is deeply appreciated.”

Jesse Emmond who received the award in 2007 and went on to become a lawyer, says while the financial need of students is almost always a significant one, there is also a need for pride and recognition.

The motivation you helped instill in me at a younger age provided a qualitative shift in understanding for what I believed I could achieve in my lifetime. It also strengthened my understanding of the value of a supportive community,” writes Emmond in an update to the Thorpes.

Danielle Hofer received the award in 2010, and says the award helped her pay for school, and save enough money to study for a semester abroad in Berlin, Germany. In her role as the President of JCI Kelowna (Jr. Chamber International) Hofer is continually growing her leadership skills, which she credits as first cultivated at the College.

“Thank you for your generous support and for your continued leadership in our community,” says Hofer.



Culinary Arts students help take a bite out of food insecurity, one apple at a time

Okanagan College Culinary Arts student

As the Okanagan days start to get shorter and orchardists wrap up their harvest for the year, Culinary Arts students at the College’s Kelowna campus are busy transforming apples into healthy snacks for the community.

Earlier in the fall semester, the Okanagan Fruit Tree Project (OFTP) approached the College’s Culinary Arts team with an idea: could culinary classes somehow help process apple donations into snacks, going into backpacks for local students in need?

The answer was a resounding yes.

With some creative thought on how to best meet curriculum requirements and please palates, Culinary Arts instructor Kelsey Oudendag identified applesauce as the best item to start with. Using it in a variety of applications, students worked to peel, core and slice apples to make the sauce as well as into apple chips. From there, they went on to use the sauce in breakfast items such as cookies and granola as well as fruit leather.

“It definitely wasn’t difficult to fit this project into the curriculum,” said Oudendag, “we use the apples in so many different ways, from teaching students how to use tools for slicing and coring to utilizing them in our different subject areas like breakfast, baking and fruit preservation.”

Lucie Bardos, project coordinator for the Okanagan Fruit Tree Project, has helped facilitate the project with Oudendag alongside Food for Thought.

“This is a unique collaboration that builds upon the existing partnership we have with Food for Thought over the past few seasons,” she said. “We typically deliver fresh produce directly to Food for Thought for their backpack and breakfast programming. In this case, Okanagan College got involved to help transform the fresh apples into products before the fruit goes to Food for Thought.”

She said, “this adds some additional variety to the food donation and an opportunity for culinary arts students to get involved in a food insecurity initiative.”

The Okanagan Fruit Tree Project functions as a registered charity, operating in the Central and South Okanagan. Orchardists and farmers contact the OFTP and a harvest is organized with the help of volunteers. Fruit is then donated to community partners like Food for Thought right away or taken to cold storage where partners can continue to pick up fruit once the harvest is over.

Food for Thought runs both the backpack and breakfast programs in the Central Okanagan region, providing meals for students at elementary, middle and secondary schools. Since the onset of COVID-19, nearly 500 backpacks per week are distributed on Fridays throughout School District No. 23 and the breakfast program provides nearly 3000 meals directly to schools. The backpacks are designed to cover food needs for the weekend for the student and their family.

For a photo gallery showcasing students transforming the apples into snacks, go here. To learn more about the work the Okanagan Fruit Tree Project is doing, go to the organization’s Facebook and Instagram pages. Details on Food for Thought, running throughout the Central Okanagan, can be found here.

This isn’t the only initiative by OC students that’s helping to feed those in need and eliminate food waste in the region. Earlier this year, Enactus OC students from Vernon adapted their award-winning FruitSnaps to continue to benefit the community during the pandemic. Read more about that project here.



UBC Okanagan rethinks and relaunches its Bachelor of Arts program

Currently accepting students for the 2021 academic year, the newly structured BA is designed to be responsive to students’ needs and to focus on learning in areas that are important for industry when hiring graduates.

Currently accepting students for the 2021 academic year, the newly structured BA is designed to be responsive to students’ needs and to focus on learning in areas that are important for industry when hiring graduates.

‘Not your grandparents’ liberal arts degree,’ says arts dean

In an era when there’s increasing emphasis on students to focus on science, technology, engineering and math—the STEM fields—UBC’s Okanagan campus is relaunching its Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree with an eye to making it even more relevant to today’s changing world.

Currently accepting students for the 2021 academic year, the newly structured BA is designed to be responsive to students’ needs and to focus on learning in areas that are important for industry when hiring graduates. These include communications, critical thinking, scientific and numeric literacy, and Indigenous understanding.

“We’ve done away with the idea of so-called ‘breadth requirements’ in favour of teaching the core skills that employers are clearly looking for,” says Bryce Traister, dean of the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies and acting dean of the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at UBC Okanagan—the two faculties that are together offering the new degree.

Traister points to the Indigenous content requirement in particular as an example how the new program is adapting and preparing the newest generation of graduates to grapple with some of the most important issues facing society.

“By introducing an Indigenous studies requirement, UBCO is joining a small handful of universities in Canada working to realize the promise of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission process through education—an important step in creating lasting change for our communities,” says Traister. “Not only do we have a moral imperative to explore and teach these ideas, but the jobs of today and those of tomorrow are going to depend on a workforce with a deep understanding and fulsome appreciation for them.”

But Traister is quick to point out that Indigenous content is just one element of the new BA program. With a long list of courses on offer that he says didn’t exist 20 years ago, students today will benefit from the variety, flexibility and choice that will make their degree more relevant than ever.

“Take a full BA in gender and sexuality studies or race and cultural studies, for example,” he says. “These weren’t available just a generation ago but it’s hard to imagine a subject area more relevant to the working conditions of women and men today, or to our collective engagement with racial inequality and justice.”

While Traister says that the STEM fields are equally important to addressing society’s challenges, it’s when science and engineering are combined with the arts and humanities that humanity can reach its full potential.

“UBCO's Bachelor of Arts degree has been rethought to do exactly that,” he adds. “Graduates will be taught to think critically and creatively, to learn from the past and re-imagine the future—better, greener, safer and more just.”

“There’s never been a more exciting time to pursue a degree in the liberal arts.”

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca



Revelstoke, Vernon student access improves with special Health Care Assistant program intake

HCA student

Training for one of B.C.’s most in-demand professions is coming to Revelstoke and Vernon this January, in a special intake designed to make the most of Okanagan College’s blended learning opportunities.

“The need for health care assistants across B.C. has never been greater. Join the frontlines and be a health-care hero for our most vulnerable citizens while also building a career for yourself,” said Sandra Hohmann, Recruiter, Interior Health.

The intake will feature OC’s signature hands-on learning in labs, allowing students to build their care skills in-person – while being protected with in-class protocols while in their home community. In addition to the hands-on instruction, students will cover theory in online classes.

“All of the components of the Health Care Assistant program are included in this hybrid delivery model, ensuring students gain hands-on experience that builds skills and confidence while they are kept safe during a pandemic,” said Monique Powell, Associate Dean of Science, Technology, Health and Social Development, Okanagan College.

“Combining the theory allows us to expand the offering to more communities, which provides more support to health care in the Okanagan College service region,” said Joan Ragsdale, Regional Dean Shuswap-Revelstoke, Okanagan College.

An online Info Night is scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 25 at 6:30 p.m. Parents and students can meet instructors, find out about various career opportunities and ask questions about the program.

To sign up for the Info Night or learn about the program, visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/hca.



College launches Applied Bachelor of Arts degree

OC Kelowna

New four-year degree focuses on community research and evaluation

Who will be the future change-makers in our communities? Who will help organizations tackle the most pressing social issues we are faced with as a society? The answer might just be the graduates of a new program unlike any before it in the region.

Okanagan College has received provincial approval for its first new degree program in more than 15 years – and its focus couldn’t be timelier.

The Applied Bachelor of Arts: Community Research and Evaluation is a four-year baccalaureate degree based out of the College’s Kelowna campus with some courses offered in Salmon Arm, Vernon and Penticton.

The new degree will provide graduates with employable skills in applied research, as well as an understanding of how the social sciences and liberal arts actively contribute to a culturally diverse, sustainable society.

Graduates will come away with the knowledge and field experience to set them up for success in roles such as program administrators, managers, and analysts in social service agencies, non-profit organizations, community groups, and various levels of government – or as consultants, social policy researchers, and advocates for youth, women, families, minorities and cultural diversity.

“We are elated to be able to offer this new applied degree program,” says Robert Huxtable, Dean of Arts and Foundational Programs for Okanagan College. “And ‘applied’ really is the key word here, as this degree is focused on providing students with advanced, applied research skills suited to practical use in the region. Supervised field experience is a central component of the program.”

“It opens up some really exciting new pathways for students and creates opportunities for the many organizations around us with community research and program evaluation needs,” he adds.

One of those pathways will be a smooth transition to graduate studies for those interested.

Thanks to an innovative partnership with the University of British Columbia Okanagan’s School of Social Work, up to 15 qualifying graduates will be eligible each year to receive guaranteed entry into one of UBCO’s Master of Social Work (MSW) graduate studies programs – and of those 15 seats, five will be held specifically for students who are members of an aboriginal group and identify as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

“We look forward to welcoming the first graduating students into the UBC School of Social Work’s two-year MSW program,” says Dr. Edward Taylor, Associate Dean in the Faculty of Health & Social Development at UBC Okanagan. “We have worked closely with the College in the development of this degree, and see the value not only for a Social Work career but for students who choose to prepare for careers related to the program of study provided by the degree.”

The program was developed specifically for the context of B.C.’s Southern Interior. Community organizations across the region have voiced their strong support for the degree and are central in the pathway to applied research and field work opportunities for graduates.

“Community support for this degree has been incredible,” says Huxtable. “The community partners we’ve consulted with have made it very clear they’re experiencing a strong need for skilled social researchers. Students will be interested to know that this is not just a social work pathway. It’s a direct-to-work pathway in many areas related to community research and evaluation where our partners emphasize there is very real demand. The program places senior students in community organizations to develop community-based research questions, leading to supervised research projects that serve the organizations’ needs.” 

“This new degree is yet another example of how the College is responding with innovative programming that is training graduates to meet skills gaps and serve employers in our region’s communities and beyond,” says Okanagan College President Jim Hamilton.

“It also highlights the wonderful partnership between the College and UBC Okanagan, which continues to strengthen and diversify. These synergies are not just good for students, they’re good for the region. We’re very proud of the collaborative approach taken with this degree and are confident it will provide a very meaningful new applied education and training pathway for students.”

Applications opened this past week for the program’s inaugural intake in Fall 2021.

Learn more at okanagan.bc.ca/aba



Pizza over procrastination: OC students power through deadlines together during annual event

Long Night Against Procrastination poster with a map showing all the ways we distract ourselves, plus the Nov. 26 date of the event

Long Night Against Procrastination is back – even with the pizza – and all from the comfort of home.

An Okanagan College rite of passage, Long Night Against Procrastination has helped countless students kick procrastination to the curb and get assignments in on time.

In recent years, the popular Penticton event had spread to multiple campuses, as students converged on campus for a late-night cram session, surrounded by faculty, librarians and Success Centre coordinators who would help with final assignments, papers and projects due at the end of term.

“We would have students on campus in their pyjamas, studying late into the night, while connecting with friends over a slice of pizza and relieving stress by doing yoga,” says Eva Gavaris, a Librarian at the Penticton campus.

“Long Night Against Procrastination was fun and productive, and we know students always looked forward to it,” says Frances Greenslade, English Department faculty member who brought the first Long Night to OC in 2015. “This tradition had to continue, despite the pandemic – so we’re adapting the event so students can have the experience at home.”

On Thursday, Nov. 26, Okanagan College students can log onto an online platform where they can join breakout rooms for help from professors, librarians and Success Centre coordinators.

The first 50 students who show up online will be provided free pizza vouchers to fuel their studies. Study breaks and stress-busting activities like yoga and meditation will be offered, and a prize draw will be held every hour starting at 8 p.m.

The entire session is free for Okanagan College students. Just register to receive the event link: www.okanagan.bc.ca/longnight.



Telehealth offers new rural health care options for Parkinson’s patients

The survey showed that 80 per cent of respondents indicated a willingness to use telehealth for follow-up appointments as part of their Parkinson’s treatment.

The survey showed that 80 per cent of respondents indicated a willingness to use telehealth for follow-up appointments as part of their Parkinson’s treatment.

Expanded access to specialized care and reduced travel key benefits for patients and caregivers

New research from the UBC Southern Medical Program (SMP) supports the use of telehealth in the care of Parkinson’s patients in rural communities, particularly within the Interior Health region.

The treatment of Parkinson’s disease is highly complex and relies heavily on a patient’s changes in their physical features over time, such as the rigidity of muscles and movement of limbs. As these characteristics can vary significantly between patients, personalized treatment plans must reflect individual circumstances and other lifestyle factors.

Fourth-year SMP student Dakota Peacock and lead author of the new study underscores the need for Parkinson’s patients to have access to quality health care regardless of the size and location of their home community.

Within the BC Interior’s vast and mountainous landscapes, lengthy travel times and hazardous road conditions, especially during the winter months, can provide additional barriers to patients and their caregivers. Additionally, the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a dramatic increase in the need for virtual health care options to support patients remotely.

“The focus of our study was to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by Parkinson’s patients within Interior Health region in accessing specialized care,” says Peacock. “We also sought to assess their potential willingness to use telehealth technologies in supporting their health and well-being.”

Dr. Daryl Wile, neurologist with the Okanagan Movement Disorder Clinic and study co-author, acknowledges the effectiveness of telehealth in Parkinson’s care is yet to be established. However, he believes certain aspects of physical exams are less critical in follow-up appointments and could be delivered remotely.

“To use telemedicine for people with Parkinson’s Disease we need to understand how we can adapt the tools we have to the many different types of symptoms they may be facing,” says Wile, clinical assistant professor with the SMP based at UBC Okanagan.

Based on the survey results, 80 per cent of respondents indicated a willingness to use telehealth for follow-up appointments as part of their Parkinson’s treatment. Key challenges reported including difficulty accessing specialized care closer to home and the financial and emotional toll of travel on caregivers or family members.

“It’s encouraging that we could potentially minimize some of the barriers and stressors for Parkinson’s patients in accessing care, but fully recognize there is no one-size-fits-all approach,” adds Peacock.

The UBC study was recently published in the Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca



OC Foundation and Jane Hoffman Realty present Season’s Eatings, a virtual cooking class fundraiser

An event image for Season's Eatings showing food and two wine glasses.

On Dec. 3, fire up your oven and your laptop to join a festive, virtual cooking class and wine tasting fundraiser.

The Okanagan College Foundation and Coldwell Banker Jane Hoffman Realty are presenting OC Cooks: Season’s Eatings, with ticket sales benefitting the Our Students, Your Health campaign to complete a new Health Sciences Centre on the College’s Kelowna campus.

“Season’s Eatings is an opportunity to come together virtually, enjoy good wine and cook alongside the College’s award-winning chefs,” says Okanagan College Foundation Executive Director Helen Jackman.

“The evening will celebrate what makes the Okanagan special, from our wineries to our culinary scene. With radio host Toby Tannas and Kelowna City Councillor Maxine DeHart co-hosting the event, we’re excited to share some laughs and the holiday spirit.”

The event will feature a guided wine tasting led by Quails' Gate Senior Sommelier Louise Dabisza and Okanagan College President Jim Hamilton as the taster. Hosted in Quails' Gate Estate library, Louise will feature several wines and discuss food and wine pairings for the holidays.

Next, participants will stir, sizzle and bake alongside Okanagan College chefs and their students as they cook a gourmet meal of mouth-watering stuffed turkey breast with cranberries and brie, warm brussels sprouts salad and potatoes pave.

Chef Danny Capadouca, head of Okanagan College’s Pastry Arts program, will decorate a cake using his own chocolates, a recipe he developed in France. Okanagan College is the first post-secondary institution outside of Europe to develop exclusive new recipes of the decadent treat.

“We’re thrilled to be presenting this event with Okanagan College Foundation,” says Jane Hoffman, founder of Coldwell Banker Jane Hoffman Realty. “Bringing our community together during this pandemic to enjoy the simple pleasure of cooking, and in doing so supporting the education of health care professionals, that is a perfect pairing.”

Participants can choose to purchase a ticket to livestream the event and have the food ingredients and wine list emailed to them. Attendees can also upgrade the evening with a Festive Bag (limited number available), which will include all the dinner ingredients pre-packed for you plus Quails' Gate wine ready to pick up at Okanagan College's Kelowna campus.

Other sponsors for Season’s Eatings include Voyager RV, Quails’ Gate, Kelowna Toyota, TD Canada Trust, Skogie’s Auto Wash, Culos Development Corp, Carrington Dental Centre and Beach Radio.

To learn more and purchase tickets for Season’s Eatings, click here.



UBCO presents inaugural Sharon Thesen Lecture

Okanagan icon John lent to give lecture on creative writing

What: Sharon Thesen Lecture
Who: UBCO Creative Writing Program
When: Thursday, November 19 at 7 p.m.
Where: Online via Zoom

UBCO is hosting its inaugural Sharon Thesen Lecture with Vernon-based author John Lent.

UBCO is hosting its inaugural Sharon Thesen Lecture with Vernon-based author John Lent.

The creative writing program at UBCO is hosting its inaugural Sharon Thesen Lecture with Vernon-based author John Lent. Lent, a professional writer, editor, singer and songwriter, will give a virtual talk titled, Aspects of Poetics in Contemporary Fiction and Poetry: a practical logic of legacies, a working arc of continuance. His presentation is based on a writer’s and teacher’s journey through the power and promise of modernism and the teaching of creative writing.

Sharon Thesen, a renowned Canadian poet and editor, was the first full professor in the department of creative studies and is now a UBC professor emerita.

“The UBC creative writing program wants to honour all that she contributes to British Columbian and Canadian literature, and all that she did to establish the creative writing program at UBC Okanagan,” explains Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies Professor Nancy Holmes. “In her honour, a different writer each year will give a lecture that tackles key issues of contemporary writing, poetics and Canadian literature. By recording each lecture, we will create a wonderful resource of contemporary thinking by writers.”

Lent has taught creative writing and literature courses at Okanagan College for over 30 years. He has published 11 books and edited 35 volumes of poetry, fiction and non-fiction for publication. His latest publication, A Matins Flywheel, is a book of poetry.

“John is a terrific writer, a master teacher of fiction and poetry, an in-demand editor and someone who pretty single-handedly created the contemporary literary culture in the Okanagan,” says Holmes. “We are honoured to have him as the first lecturer in our Sharon Thesen series.”

The lecture is free and open to the public. It will take place on November 19 starting at 7 p.m.

For further information, visit fccs.ok.ubc.ca/visiting-author

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca



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