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50 year old beer

When Diane and Ed Nusselhuf married in 1971, they bought themselves a can of Coors beer, which they promised to drink on their 50th wedding anniversary. For nearly five decades, that can of beer followed them to Wisconsin, Minneapolis, British Columbia, Maryland and finally, South Dakota, KCAU reported. But Sadly, Ed passed away in 2016, just five years short of the anniversary. But Diane celebrated on the date with her son, Ben. “Here’s to you, Ed,” Diane said as they toasted to her late husband.

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Castanet MoodMeter
Skeptical
3.1%
Convinced
25.0%
Curious
3.1%
Intrigued
46.9%
Surprised
18.8%
Scared
3.1%


Moustache style guide

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Castanet MoodMeter
Informed
46.2%
Convinced
7.7%
Surprised
3.8%
Amazed
3.8%
Impressed
7.7%
Awesome
30.8%


Destroying pottery for fun

Eric Landon is a Danish American ceramics artist and designer. He founded Tortus Copenhagen studio with his brother. Eric travels around the world teaching workshops about his craft, and when he throws a wet piece for a class, he can't take it with him. This means he usually has to destroy it after. He finds creative ways to destroy his pieces, either cutting them in half with a string or popping them with his hand or even his mouth. He says he has fun doing this because he gets to "let the piece go."

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Shocked
10.7%
Disappointed
39.3%
Informed
7.1%
Curious
17.9%
Surprised
10.7%
Unsure
14.3%


Churches built without nails

Two wooden churches and a bell tower have proudly stood on Kizhi Island in Russia for hundreds of years, weathering the test and tumult of time with only a tree-born tenacity. That's a dramatic way of saying that these impressive and ornate structures were built in the traditional Russian carpentry style, using only wooden logs with interlocking corners—no nails or metal supports here whatsoever. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Church of the Transfiguration, the Church of the Intercession and their corresponding bell tower are a reminder that craft and ingenuity really are what building's all about.

How does this story make you feel? (40 total votes)
Castanet MoodMeter
Informed
7.5%
Curious
2.5%
Intrigued
2.5%
Amazed
7.5%
Impressed
35.0%
Awesome
45.0%


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